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EVENTS

Marked for Life: Are Genetic Markers Helpful in Understanding Psychological Disorders?

Progress Educational Trust
Main Lecture Theatre, Royal Society of Medicine, 1 Wimpole Street, London W1G 0AE
03 March 2010

Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Derek Bolton, Professor Nick Craddock and Fenno Outen speaking at the Progress Educational Trust event 'Marked for Life: Are Genetic Markers Helpful in Understanding Psychological Disorders?' (photograph by Lahiru Dayananda)

Left to right: Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Derek Bolton, Professor Nick Craddock, Fenno Outen
Photograph by Lahiru Dayananda
See other photographs of this event below


This evening debate was organised by the Progress Educational Trust (PET) in partnership with the Royal Society of Medicine, and was supported by the Wellcome Trust. A video recording of the event is available on the Royal Society of Medicine website. The event formed part of the PET project Spectrum of Opinion: Genes, Autism and Psychological Spectrum Disorders, and a synopsis of the proceedings forms part of the School Resource Pack created by PET as part of this project.

By the end of 2008, genome-wide association studies of autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and schizophrenia in 80,000 subjects and 40billion total genotypes were said to constitute the largest biological experiment ever conducted in psychiatry. Since then, a massive international project has set out to coordinate this growing wealth of genetic data. The first batch of analyses resulting from this work identified several significant common genetic variations associated with schizophrenia, and further findings are expected in 2010. Elsewhere, a 'transcriptional atlas of human brain development' is being created to understand patterns of gene expression relevant to mental health.

What, if anything, does such genetic and epigenetic research mean for those with psychological disorders, their families and their carers? How does the heritability of these conditions relate to genetic, environmental and stochastic (random) factors? Can society's contribution to psychological disorders be usefully captured by categories such as 'gene' and 'environment', or does it need to be considered separately? If you are found to have 'the gene for' a disorder (as the popular expression has it), does this effectively mean you are marked for life?




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  • Royal Society of Medicine

  • Wellcome Trust



Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Derek Bolton, Professor Nick Craddock, Fenno Outen and Sarah Norcross speaking at the Progress Educational Trust event 'Marked for Life: Are Genetic Markers Helpful in Understanding Psychological Disorders?' (photograph by Lahiru Dayananda)

Left to right: Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Derek Bolton, Professor Nick Craddock, Fenno Outen, (at podium) Sarah Norcross
Photograph by Lahiru Dayananda


Sandy Starr speaking at the Progress Educational Trust event 'Marked for Life: Are Genetic Markers Helpful in Understanding Psychological Disorders?' (photograph by Lahiru Dayananda)

At podium: Sandy Starr
Photograph by Lahiru Dayananda


Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Derek Bolton, Professor Nick Craddock, Fenno Outen and Sandy Starr speaking at the Progress Educational Trust event 'Marked for Life: Are Genetic Markers Helpful in Understanding Psychological Disorders?' (photograph by Lahiru Dayananda)

Left to right in background: Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Derek Bolton, Professor Nick Craddock, Fenno Outen, (at podium) Sandy Starr
Photograph by Lahiru Dayananda


Professor Derek Bolton, Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Nick Craddock and Fenno Outen speaking at the Progress Educational Trust event 'Marked for Life: Are Genetic Markers Helpful in Understanding Psychological Disorders?' (photograph by Lahiru Dayananda)

Left to right on speaker panel: Professor Derek Bolton, Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Nick Craddock, Fenno Outen
Photograph by Lahiru Dayananda


Professor Derek Bolton, Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Nick Craddock and Fenno Outen speaking at the Progress Educational Trust event 'Marked for Life: Are Genetic Markers Helpful in Understanding Psychological Disorders?' (photograph by Lahiru Dayananda)

Left to right: Professor Derek Bolton, Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Nick Craddock, Fenno Outen
Photograph by Lahiru Dayananda


Professor Derek Bolton, Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Nick Craddock and Fenno Outen speaking at the Progress Educational Trust event 'Marked for Life: Are Genetic Markers Helpful in Understanding Psychological Disorders?' (photograph by Lahiru Dayananda)

Left to right: Professor Derek Bolton, Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Nick Craddock, Fenno Outen
Photograph by Lahiru Dayananda


Professor Derek Bolton and Dr Anand Saggar speaking at the Progress Educational Trust event 'Marked for Life: Are Genetic Markers Helpful in Understanding Psychological Disorders?' (photograph by Lahiru Dayananda)

Left to right: Professor Derek Bolton, Dr Anand Saggar
Photograph by Lahiru Dayananda


Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Nick Craddock and Fenno Outen speaking at the Progress Educational Trust event 'Marked for Life: Are Genetic Markers Helpful in Understanding Psychological Disorders?' (photograph by Lahiru Dayananda)

Left to right: Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Nick Craddock, Fenno Outen
Photograph by Lahiru Dayananda


Professor Derek Bolton, Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Nick Craddock and Fenno Outen at the Progress Educational Trust event 'Marked for Life: Are Genetic Markers Helpful in Understanding Psychological Disorders?' (photograph by Lahiru Dayananda)

Left to right: Professor Derek Bolton, Dr Anand Saggar, Professor Nick Craddock, Fenno Outen
Photograph by Lahiru Dayananda


Books on display at the Progress Educational Trust event 'Marked for Life: Are Genetic Markers Helpful in Understanding Psychological Disorders?' - 'Changing the Course of Autism: A Scientific Approach for Parents and Physicians', 'Autism: Mind and Brain', 'Effective Practices for Children with Autism: Educational and Behavioural Support Interventions that Work' and 'Stress and Coping in Autism' (photograph by Lahiru Dayananda)

On display, left to right:

Changing the Course of Autism: A Scientific Approach for Parents and Physicians
(buy this book from Amazon UK or Amazon USA)

Autism: Mind and Brain
(buy this book from Amazon UK or Amazon USA)

Effective Practices for Children with Autism: Educational and Behavioural Support Interventions that Work
(buy this book from Amazon UK or Amazon USA)

Stress and Coping in Autism
(buy this book from Amazon UK or Amazon USA)

Photograph by Lahiru Dayananda


The Progress Educational Trust event 'Marked for Life: Are Genetic Markers Helpful in Understanding Psychological Disorders?' (photograph by Lahiru Dayananda)

Main lecture theatre at the Royal Society of Medicine
Photograph by Lahiru Dayananda

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